The World of Online Payments

Read full series at the Control blog: Part 1/Part 2/Part 3/ Part 4/ Part 5

Let’s embark on a trip together, shall we? In this five-part series, we’ll be exploring payment solutions around the world and discussing the cultural and technological differences that enable diversified methods of online payments.

Because the world is linked together in so many ways, one of which is the digital marketplace, it’s crucial for your business to understand how a certain demographic prefers to pay. Acknowledging your audience’s payment preference, regardless of which country or hemisphere they live on, is business intelligence that will make you fluent in the payments world.

North America: In North America, credit card is king in terms of online payments. However, there are a number of payment options rising in popularity across the continent. [Read full article here]

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South America: In South America, the middle class is rising and the unbanked and underbanked population are now accessing online payments. All this is changing commerce. [Read full article here]

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Europe: Europe is home to many different languages, buying cultures, & online payments. Each of those elements will be vital as eCommerce penetration grows. [Read full article here]

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Asia/Australia: There are two Asian markets online, one is leading the industry and the other is rising. Online payments will be the keystone for both as trends continue. [Read full article here]

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Africa: Africa is a region with fastest growing Internet penetration. Online payments, along with regulations and infrastructure, can help eCommerce thrive. [Read full article here]

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Pricing Your Product Properly Matters

Before you sell your products or market your services you must first identify the cost. Understanding the price will give you a better perspective of your potential revenue, competitors  and target customers. Pricing your product is a defining mark for your company and should not be taken lightly. Follow this five-part series to understand the complexity, trickery, and science behind pricing.

Originally published on Control. March 12, 2015

Part One: Cost-plus Pricing or Value-based Pricing

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There are two general principles to pricing your products and services. You can rather implement the cost-plus or the value-based pricing method. Whichever one you choose, it will not only define your product but your company as a whole.

So what’s the difference?

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Part Two: 7 Free Tricks To Pricing Your Product

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The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

Shoppers are inherently programmed to compare prices. If you place a $20 T-shirt next to one that costs $50, it is instantly clear which one is more affordable. However, if the $20 one is made to be far less desirable and—for what you are getting—is still quite pricy. That’s because the intention is not to sell the $20 product, but to get people to opt for the more expensive deal for the reason that it’s actually worth it.

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Part Three: Tiered Pricing Can Take Your Product To The Next Level

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Tiered pricing gives people choices—and we all know that people love choices. When it comes to payment, choices may bring more value to your customers. Why not let them choose how much they want and how much to pay for it? After all, when you go to the coffee shop you want the freedom to pick Small, Medium, or Large. This ideology can work for your product or services too.

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Part Four: 6 Ways To Conduct An Effective Discount Promotional Campaign

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After the free samples and 14-days trial period, you may be pressed to earn more leads and gain more revenue. Without adjusting your standard price, you’ve decided that implementing a discount or promotional campaign is the best avenue to take. However, there are no fixed rules when applying discounts or generating coupons. You can hand out flyers on the street, but all that effort may be wasted time. Here are six tips to conducting a successful discount promotional campaign.

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Odds are at one point or another you’ll want to increase the price of your product. Investors, competitors, your internal team, and even the public may be urging you to do so. You yourself know that the current price is under valuing your product and this path is no longer sustainable. There are many reasons why raising the price makes sense, but the question is not why you should hike prices, but how to do it effectively without losing customers and decreasing your conversion rate.

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Why Drug-Impaired Driving May Be a Huge Problem in Canada

Posted by  | November 04, 2014 |
Formerly published in Unhaggle.com

Why Drug-Impaired Driving May Be a Huge Problem in Canada

Impaired driving is dangerous; it doesn’t matter if it’s caused by fatigue, alcohol or drugs, because you are taking an unnecessary risk one way or another. Although it’s true that drugs, such as marijuana, affect each person differently, it’s also true that from 1999 to 2010 drug-related fatalitieshave almost doubled. The question is why. Here are some theories:

There Are No Proper Regulations

Law enforcers have done certainly much to deter drivers from driving drunk, but they still have trouble discovering and implementing the most effective measure for stopping drug-impaired drivers from grabbing their keys and getting behind the wheel. Canada has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars to make sure that law officials attend unique drug-recognition training courses. However, the program is not believed to have reached its full potential when it comes to catching and actually convicting impaired drivers.

Many Think It’s Okay to Drive High

While drinking and driving is taboo, driving under the influence of drugs still somehow goes under the radar, and that’s problematic. The attitude of drivers needs to change, especially among younger ones, who have always shown a more carefree mentality when operating a vehicle. In a study conducted by Drug Free Canada, one in three teenagers considers smoking marijuana and driving to be less dangerous than drinking and driving, which is not very comforting. Driving requires a lot of attention, and a sudden lapse of judgement for whatever reason can be deadly on the road.

In order to change this reckless attitude, lawmakers in North America, Australia and certain countries in Europe have implemented a legal limit of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) – in some parts of the U.S., it’s five nanograms per millilitre of blood – as well as protocols for officers to perform when they suspect the driver to be under the influence of drugs. One method practiced in Norway and Australia involves requesting oral fluid samples from drivers, which can be obtained with a quick roadside test that involves licking or swabbing of the tongue.

By giving officers more resources to catch drug-impaired drivers, the mentality of people may eventually change.

Drug Users Are Not Punished Enough

There are many reasons why our society frowns upon drinking and driving, and one of those reasons is the fact that the police categorizes the  as a high-priority issue. Why else would they have roadblocks, breathalysers and other sobriety tests? Because drinking and driving is very obviously illegal.

Some political parties believe that the whole penalty system should change so that drug-impaired drivers could receive punishment equal to those who drink and drive. The Transportation Minister of Ontario, Steven Del Duca, believes that implementing roadside suspensions, mandatory education or treatment, an ignition interlock condition and a seven-day vehicle impoundment are some of the first important steps to take in order to convince the public of the severity of drug use.

“And when you look at the statistics, in 2011 for example, somewhere in the neighbourhood of 46 per cent of all collisions involving vehicles that resulted in deaths had individuals who were either under the influence of drugs or a combination of drugs and alcohol,” says Del Duca.

In Canada 2012, however, only 1,126 drug-impaired driving charges were laid, which makes up 2 per cent of all annual impaired driving charges (alcohol-impairment charges exceed 60,000). The inability to confidently confirm impairment on the scene has led to many challenges for those wanting to see an end to drug-impaired driving. This is mainly because the technology used for catching drunk drivers does not work on drug users.

So What Can Help Us?

Law enforcers could definitely benefit from a few technological innovations. Breathalysers have changed the way officers charge drunk drivers, and as such, we need a device that can do the same for drivers who are high. The Cannabix Breathalyser might be the solution. In less than a few minutes, this hand-held device, conceived by BC-based company West Point Resources, can accurately detect whether a person has consumed marijuana or not. Given its success rate, this new technology could also act as another deterrent for anyone who is thinking of using drugs before driving.

Generally speaking, the point is not to argue whether smoking weed is better or worse than drinking a couple of beers – the point is to reduce fatalities. And in order to do that, drivers need to change their mindsets, while politicians and lawmakers have to reconsider their approach and provide law enforcers with better technology. It won’t be easy, but it’s definitely doable!

Everything You Need to Know About Car Tires

Posted by  | October 29, 2014 |
Originally published on Unhaggle.com
Everything You Need to Know About Car TiresThere is a wide range of car tires out in the market that drivers often don’t even know about. Depending on the driver’s lifestyle, road conditions and weather, car tires can change the whole driving experience. Performance tires can give you more control; off-road tires can offer more confidence on rough terrains; and low profile tires look sleek and handle better.

While some drivers choose to stick with all-season tires for the majority of the year and swap over to snow or winter tires for a few months, there are many other options to consider. The same way we have different shoes for different occasions, our BMW 328i should also be able to slip into something more comfortable, enabling it to perform at its safest and best.

Performance Tires

Before engines and suspensions, consider getting performance tires if you want to go faster and get better handling around corners. The rubber found in performance tires has stiffer sidewalls and a softer composition, which allows drivers to respond to the road better – be it stopping with ease or turning with precision.

Although performance tires will undoubtedly enhance your ride, they do wear out faster because of their low tread. Therefore, those tires are often recommended for high-end sports cars and sports sedans. However, there are several types of performance tires to note: Tires rated S or T are often categorized as performance tires just by their appearance and are generally designed for passenger cars and minivans; tires rated H or V are called performance touring tires and have the best all-season capability; and finally, there are the ultra-high performance sport tires, which are rated W, Y or Z, which are designed to enhance handling.

Because of the nature of performance tires, drivers would often own different sets, depending on the driving scenario.

Truck Tires

Vehicles with large inventories and cargo towing responsibilities will require truck tires for better comfort and handling. Generally speaking, these vehicles are used to transport goods across long distances, which makes coping with highways easier. Truck tires are built to boost traction and diminish potential hydroplaning on slippery roads.

Although truck tires can handle many terrains, they do have some characteristics that separate them from off road and all-terrain tires. Most notably, truck tires lack the extra bite and will not grab the rocky, muddy roads as well as their rugged counterparts.

Off-Road Tires

The key attributes of off-road tires are the large treads that grip the road, called lugs, and the deep spaces in-between the lugs that divert wetness on soft and soggy surfaces. Built with a reinforced sidewall and puncture-resistance material, off-road tires are all about traction and endurance and should be fully capable of taking you and your vehicle through the most beaten of paths.

All-Terrain Tires

All-terrain tires combine the open treads and superior traction of off-road tires with the functionality of all-season tires. They enable drivers to operate comfortably on both rocky, muddy roads and clean, smooth highways.

Some minor downsides of driving around in the city with all-terrain tires is that the ride will probably be a lot noisier than with all-season or truck tires. In addition, all-terrain tires are often designed with a softer type of rubber than off-road tires, which ultimately reduces their lifespan. So, it’s worth calculating: If you drive off-road more frequently, then perhaps you might want to consider off-road tires instead of all-terrain, just because of the longevity.

Low-Profile Tires

Low-profile tires refer to the size of the tire’s edge, which means a shorter sidewall height or the amount of rubber between the road and the rim of the wheel. Low-profile tires are attractive because they offer better handling, and their design enables manufacturers to offer bigger brakes.

Although some drivers find low-profile tires to appear more attractive aesthetically, the tire can often be described as stiffer, which causes jarring and agitating rides. Also because of the thinner edge, low-profile tires are more susceptible to deflation overtime.

If a smooth ride is what you are after, low-profile tires might not be your first choice. However, if you have your heart set, you may like to consider upgrading your vehicle in other aspects to accommodate the tires – such as implementing suspension hardware.

All-Season Tires

At last we arrive at all-season tires – the ones we are most familiar with. All-season tires are designed to handle most situations well – not great, but well – and for many drivers that’s fine, since dependability is what most car owners want.

Nevertheless, all-season tires have limitations and may fail to serve your car during snowy days, on gravel roads, and in the course of high-speed chases (not that we condone speeding). Like all things car-related, selecting tires for your vehicle is all about sensibility. Know your car, know your road and know which tires are best for you.

Want to Start A Scalable Business? Here Are Some Ideas

 

You want to start a scalable business because you have huge aspirations. Unlike running the mom ‘n’ pop shops in your neighbourhood, you want more than a few loyal customers. You want to grow your company, reach new investors, and expand across the city, the country, and even the world.

A scalable business is a company capable of multiplying revenue without compromising the resulting profits. You’ll charge the same price per customer if you have 100 or if you have 100,000, and more clients doesn’t equal larger workload. That is a scalable business.

When your company is ready to scale, it’ll have a desirable product and an established business model. Not only will your friends and family think your ideas are great, but investors will come knocking as well.

So where do you begin? What exactly does this type of business look like? To get you started on your road to glory, here are a few examples of businesses proven to have scalable potential.

Software Companies

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Why are some of the biggest companies in the world based around software? Well, it’s because quality software can be replicated over and over again without excessive expenditure. A software startup with limited capital can build a minimum viable product (MVP) with budding potential and present it to the market and investors. Then over night, they can gain a huge following, or disappear with miniscule damages.

Whether your new company is based around a SaaS model or utilizes the cloud, building around a low-cost deliverable will help your scalability.

Take a quick look at the world’s largest software companies, Microsoft and Oracle. These two brands are churning out products that consumers don’t even know they are purchasing. Once the developed product is ready for the market, consumers can access it with a few clicks. No need to stock it on a shelf and no need to drive to a store and buy it.

When products need physical applications, such as the case of CD-ROMS, smart companies will outsource the operation without compromising the team’s time, efforts, and intellect. Scaling does not all happen internally. Sometimes your company will need help.

E-commerce

Online shopping is a worldwide phenomenon and it’s only growing. Unlike brick-and-mortar businesses, e-commerce has exceptional scalable capacity. While some shoppers are searching for a desired product, many are just browsing (window-shopping) hoping that something will catch their eyes. Here is where your company appears.

It’s true that products available online are also available in stores. So with that in mind, how can you possibly set your brand apart in this cramped market place?

The answer is trust. What do people hate about department stores? The cavernous warehouse sensation, the time-consuming journey through the wrong aisle, and the often-indignant customer service. A scalable e-commerce business must offer a solid product and a customer oriented business model to match.

Take the fashion startup Indochino for example. The formalwear company focuses solely on giving the modern men—who are often reluctant to get garment measured and tailored—an experience that is worthwhile and enjoyable.

In addition, successful e-commerce startups offer incentives that retail stores often omit. Coupons, discounts, and various other marketing strategies to gain loyalty are ways to turn your savings into new customers.

Social Network and Gamification

Perhaps it is too late to invent Facebook or Twitter, but your scalable startup can still connect people together in different ways.

Two prime examples of scalable businesses that leverage social media for success areFourSquare, a mobile app that learns what you like and suggest places for you to go, and OpenTable, a service that allows you to make dinner reservations quick and easy. Both of these applications fulfill that public demand to explore and evaluate, while providing a gamified element that encourages users to return.

Monotonous and stress-inducing problems seep into our lives constantly. If you can build a company that makes even one of those problems enjoyable (or even bearable), such as finding someone to help you clean your house, like TaskRabbit does, then you are on your way to creating something scalable.

Read more about business and payment on Control

5 Things We Should Know About Mobile Payment

 Originally published on Control. Feb 18, 2015

Consumer habits have changed significantly in the past few years. The market must recognize the driving force of mobile and web payment. Paying customers are demanding ease and seamlessness more than ever, and lengthy processes will ultimately lead to your company’s demise.

The Paperless Trend

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The shift from paper to digital is happening in many forms, but one clear instance is in payment. According to Aite Group, in 2013 digital payments accounted for almost half of all bills paid in the United States. The reason is clear: Why bother with the hassle of writing a cheque and mailing it when you can get those nasty bills off your shoulders quickly.

Millennials prefer online payment. Even though they own chequebooks, they rarely use them.

The Consumer Mindset

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The payment processing industry is currently the fifth fastest growing sector in the United States and there is a lot of room for growth. However, marketers must remember that consumers aren’t making payments for the sake of making payments. They want to buy a new shirt, reserve tickets to a concert, or book a flight for vacation. Accessing their funds is just something that occurs in the back of their mind and companies should not interfere with that.

Consumers are looking for the next easy-to-use platform. Be it Stripe, PayPal, Apple Pay, or even SnapChat, those making purchases favor companies capable of integrating payment unobtrusively.

The Brave New World

Don’t hesitate to make a change if the end goal is to make the product better and easier to use. The shift from credit cards to mobile payment wasn’t the swiftest transition in history, but it happened. Take a look at Starbucks cards and their payment app. If you are an avid coffee drinker there’s little reason not to buy into it. Tech-savvy users aren’t afraid to make payments in different ways. Nevertheless, the processes only work if the company has something of value to reel the consumers in with.

There is no fear, there just needs to be a reason.

The Learning Curve

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Customer education is one common criticism for companies integrating new technology into a campaign or overall structure. Not every customer will be a tech-savvy and technical person, so support is often appreciated. Look at the mobile banking industry for example. For years, mobile banking had been available, however, only 10% [according to ath Power Consulting] of users were advised to access their finances through their devices rather than visiting a brick-and-mortar bank.

A little helping hand at the start can ease your consumers into the mobile payment process. Studies have shown that the little extra steps early on payoff in customer loyalty.

The Universal Mobile Payment Method

Are we overloading consumers with payment options? Perhaps. But keep in mind, most services are exclusive to certain devices or individual accounts. Apple Pay users can only use Apple products to make transactions. PayPal merchants can only accept payments from PayPal users with the app.

If we are going to pick a universal mobile payment method we have to highlight CurrentC, developed by The Merchant Customer Exchange. Over 110,000 retailersincluding Best Buy and Walmart are already equipped with the POS hardware and connected to the network. In addition, the app will use tokenized data to complete transactions, instead of the traditional card data, albeit the service so far has been considered “clunky”. Mutually beneficial partnerships, and not coercion, will be the key to developing a successful universal mobile payment method.

We are a long ways away from crowning any payment method as the universal choice. At the moment it’s coming down to the customer’s priority and lifestyle, and that is how it should remain.

Are Talking Cars a Bad Idea?

Posted by  | October 22, 2014 |
Originally published in Unhaggle.com
Are Talking Cars a Good Idea?

Talking cars have been portrayed in media for generations, but now this fantasy is closer to reality than ever. Of course, I’m not talking about KITT from Knight Rider or Herby the Love Bug (be sure to view our list of top movie cars for more goodies). What I’m referring to is an innovative vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology that enables cars on the road to communicate with one another.

By 2020, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is hoping to have mandated the new automotive communication system in an effort to reduce collisions. Relying on various global-positioning systems, radars and cameras, the new on-board feature will assist drivers by warning them of on-coming traffic, hazardous intersections, complicated left turns and other potential risks.

The question is – are these systems going to be effective?

Pro: Safety and Serviceability

NHTSA believes that this initiative will reduce 592,000 accidents a year, thus saving 1,083 lives. And according to a study conducted by the Government Accountability Office, approximately 76 per cent of crashes that involve two or more vehicles can be reduced with V2V technologies.

In addition, V2V technologies will also supply general traffic information to the driver when they commuting. Through the wireless connectivity to other vehicles, the driver will see which roads are congested in order to avoid them. This type of data will undoubtedly save time and fuel, as well as reduce traffic jams.

If safety and serviceability is the priority, there is no doubt that talking cars will indeed be a good idea.

Con: Privacy

However, there are a few matters to consider regarding talking cars that are causing car owners to think twice before driving off in such an intelligent machine.

The most immediate concern for V2V car buyers is the privacy factor. In a global infrastructure where hackers rule the day, talking cars could become large targets. Once cars become wirelessly linked to each other through cellular networks, hackers will be able to intercept those signals, and from there, drivers can only imagine the worst-case scenario, which may in fact make talking cars more dangerous than your average “mute” cars. With over 100 million lines of code involved in V2V technology, programmers and engineers are staying realistic when constructing firewalls and other security measures to restrict unwanted entries.

The Verdict

Since 2012, the University of Michigan Transportation Safety Research Institute, with 80 per cent of funding from U.S. Department of Transportation, have been undergoing an experiment where approximately 3,000 V2V cars are driving around Ann Arbor, Michigan. The project’s goal is to examine the system in full scale, determine whether traffic rules need altering and understand the safety benefits better. Recently, the organization has announced that they are planning to scale the project, tripling the connected vehicles on the road to 9,000.

By 2016, NHTSA and car manufacturers should be able to have a clearer understanding of what talking cars can do. Then they will be able to relay those findings to drivers to (hopefully) eliminate any form of doubt when it comes to this technology. After all, V2V technology will only function properly if the drivers actually buy into it.

It’s true that talking cars are not solving every problem on the road; in fact, the majority of accidents today only involve a single car, which is not something V2V technology can help prevent. But talking cars are a giant step forward in public safety.

This new automotive communication feature may have its downsides, but it should still be embraced. After all, it will not only make rescuing people in accidents easier, but allow us to avert collisions altogether.

Anti-Theft Devices: Are They Worth the Money?

Posted by  | October 09, 2014 |
Originally Published on Unhaggle.com 
Anti-Theft Devices: Are They Worth the Money?

Anti-theft devices exist in many forms to combat the variety of car thieves out there. From high-tech GPS-based tracking systems to low-tech steering-wheel locking mechanisms, anti-theft devices are car owner’s last line of defence in unfamiliar parkades and dimly-lit streets.

Here are some good news and bad news. Bad news: according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada, Canadians spend approximately $1 billion each year due to stolen automobiles. Good news: from 2011 to 2012, 4,500 fewer vehicles were stolen, which adds up to a vehicle theft decrease of 57% in the past decade.

What does this all mean for car owners? It seems that although there is a clear decline in car theft, there is still a lucrative market out there that thrives on stolen car parts, which is why anti-theft devices are still needed. But, are they worth the price and inconvenience?

Here are some pros and cons to help you decide whether your vehicle requires any anti-theft devices:

Pro: Technology Has Improved

Car alarms used to have this spastic siren that both alerts and annoys the user. A gentle bump can be misconstrued as a code-red breach and everyone in the neighbourhood would know about it. That is no longer the case. The latest car alarm innovations include multistage electronics that work with shock sensors to gage whether the nudge was accidental or intentional.

In addition, new inaudible alert applications can be downloaded to car owners’ smartphones. If someone is breaking into your vehicle or a shopping cart crashed into it at the store, you’ll know right away via Push Notification.

Con: Thieves Have Improved As Well

Hoodlums are afraid of car alarms, professional thieves aren’t. Many anti-theft devices are built to stump the amateur, but present little resistance against the experienced.

Alarms alert and immobilizers slow down the thief, but other than that, they really don’t do much. It goes to show that devices are just the most basic form of prevention.

Pro: It Only Needs To Work Once

Although anti-theft devices can cost thousands of dollars, they only need to work once to pay off. If you only have liability coverage with your insurance company, the most you can get is the vehicle’s reimbursed market value if it is not found or cost of repairs if the vehicle is found, but in poor condition and under a certain amount of days.

In a quick comparison, you’ll see that a security device is a cheaper solution than a long-term comprehensive auto insurance plan.

Con: Nothing Beats Common Sense

Often you don’t need security at all, because common sense might do just fine. Some car owners can’t even tell you what anti-theft features are out on the market, because they don’t need to. Instead, they use their best judgement when they park their car.

Car theft is most common in urban areas, and older vehicles are much easier to be broken into and disassembled for parts. By being aware of your surroundings and concealing valuable items within, you are already doing a part in preventing theft.

Pro: Security Features May Lower Your Premium

That said, having additional anti-theft features may qualify your vehicle for a discount when purchasing insurance. Statistically speaking, cars with security features are less likely to be broken into and stolen, so many insurance companies will offer a lower premium for that very reason.

Most Common Anti-Theft Devices

Additional devices for your vehicle may be a costly endeavor, but in my opinion, the pros outweigh the cons, and I believe that it is better to have one than not. What is that old childhood adage? Better safe than sorry.

Here are a few common security features you should consider:

Steering-wheel lock ($25 – $100): Commonly known as clubs, steering-wheel locks are very common and do a decent job immobilizing the vehicle, while also limiting its manoeuvrability. However, it is not foolproof, and professional car thieves will not be foiled by it.

Alarm system ($40 – $1,400): Always useful in getting attention, but not always useful in getting help. If a car alarm doesn’t scare away the thieves immediately, there is little struggle presented after.

Kill switch ($10 – $125): Although some cars don’t allow for a kill switch, it is still an effective system for shutting down the engine, which leaves thieves stranded in a stolen vehicle. In order for the kill switch to work, it must be concealed or the thief might disable it.

GPS-based vehicle tracking system ($500-$1000): Tracking systems don’t exactly stop criminals from stealing your vehicle, but they do offer a 90-per-cent return rate by working with your local law enforcers.

Why You Should Buy a Small Car

Posted by  | September 24, 2014 |
Originally published in Unhaggle.com 
Why You Should Buy a Small Car

When it comes to buying a new car, bigger is not always better. Small cars, generally defined as two- or four-seat vehicles, have a length of less than 457.2 centimetres and wheelbase of less than 266.7 centimetres and may in fact be the better choice in terms of drivability, safety and practicality.

In the past, large cars and trucks were highly touted, because they could haul more cargo, transport bigger parties and never compromise safety. But drivers are not looking to move furniture every other week now, and with hatchbacks such as the Honda Fit, they can easily take some more time at Costco, knowing that the adjustable room is flexible and accommodating, if not spacious.

The world is changing, and as more and more cars appear on the road, being smaller might just be the best driving advantage you can have.

Safety First

We often hear about the hypothetical collision between a Hummer and Smart Car. The image of a smooshed petite vehicle is what appears in our heads, thus deterring us from driving them. Though, in terms of physics, a small car is less likely to prevail in a small-verses-big-vehicle collision, it doesn’t mean that small cars are dangerous.

Larger cars have numerous dodgy factors to consider too. With a higher centre of gravity, large vehicles, such as SUVs, are more likely to roll over, and trucks with unequal weight distributions can fishtail aggressively on wet pavement. All large vehicles offer is a false sense of security and that’s often more hazardous.

The IIHS report clearly shows vast improvements in small-car safety between 2005 and 2011. New safety technologies, like electronic stability control and full side airbags, as well as improved structural materials have reduced the death toll of small-car drivers by 50 per cent. One can only assume that the number will continue to drop as small cars become even more progressive safety-savvy.

Driving Sensibility

There is nothing worse than traversing a tight alley or searching for a parking spot in an urban area, except maybe doing all of that in a large cumbersome vehicle. Small cars tend to be nimbler and more responsive, making it the more practical choice for city drivers. Entering cramp parkades and taking tight turns on smaller roads is easier when you don’t have extraneous parts daring to scrap against a pillar, parked vehicle or pedestrian.

Driving a smaller vehicle is simply the more sensible choice for novice and experienced drivers. After all, there is no such thing as wasted space, both inside and out. Getting around isn’t a big ordeal when you’re unobtrusive.

Better Performance

Small cars have less mass, enabling better performance without installation of a more powerful engine. That is why sleek, speedy sports cars are often smaller and lighter. While true sport and muscle cars have an increased length, adding to the aerodynamic features of the car for a smoother ride, more modest cars can hold their own too without any further strain or modifications. Small cars, as far as they go, are built to perform with less effort. Whether it is an every-day situation or long road trip down the coast, driving a smaller car is all in all a better experience, and it’s all because of the performance.

Fit in Compact Spaces, Including Your Tiny Garage

We are now living in a world of over seven billion people. It’s hard to imagine an automobile and a parking space for everybody. In North America, we feel as though we have unlimited amount of room, but that’s not true. Space is a fading commodity in the city core, parking lots and garages. Owning a large vehicle may be a way to showcase prosperity, but it also exhibits negligence and tactlessness. If you are buying a large vehicle to fuel your own desire, please reconsider, because if you don’t make room for us, there might not be room for you either.

Big Savings

When sifting through a list of affordable cars, you’d find that the majority are smaller vehicles. There are many factors adding up to savings, including fewer materials, better fuel economy, cheaper insurance rate and less maintenance.

In addition, smaller vehicles are also more environmentally-friendly. Electric and hybrid options are in high demand, not only because of the green factors, but also because it means money saved in your pocket. As emission taxes and gas prices increase, it only makes sense that our car sizes should decrease.

To all the car buyers out there: recall the Volkswagen Beetle ad that revolutionized a generation and “Think small.”